What is the Best Civilian Job for a Military Personnel Officer?

Military personnel officers are considered in some circles to be the “management” of the military, with responsibilities that can range from human resources work and records management to handling groups of recruits and managing lower-ranking members of the armed forces on a regular basis. These skills are actually among the easiest to translate into a broad series of civilian careers and occupations, making it a relatively quick process to apply for jobs, land interviews, and present the right qualifications needed to land the positions. So, where should personnel officers get started?

Consider Human Resources Positions as a Great Option

Military personnel officers often have more experience handling personnel files, records, benefits, and other claims, than even many dedicated human resources professionals do. After all, the military is currently one of the largest employers in the United States and it requires a great deal of successful management to keep all levels of military members in line. Simply noting how these skills were put into place is often enough to impress even the most discerning interviewer.

To add value to these interviews, most military personnel officers can note the intense, and often very strict, deadlines that characterized their position. Most people understand that the military has very little margin for error, and they’re more than willing to bring on management types and human resources professionals who appreciate sticking to a schedule and refusing to fall behind.

Corporate Management Positions are a Good Fit

Of course, many military personnel officers go well beyond the scope of paperwork, electronic records, and matters involving benefits or other routine issues. In fact, many personnel officers often find themselves managing entire departments within the military or handling a group of people who need to be trained and brought into the fold. These skills blend almost seamlessly with corporate America and, as mentioned earlier, their combination with strict adherence to deadlines and benchmarks only makes military veterans more attractive when they interview for these positions.

With skills gained within the military, veterans with personnel experience have what it takes to manage corporate departments and keep groups of people dedicated to meeting deadlines. They’ll be able to boost productivity in many cases, helping their new employers boost profits while lowering expenses. All of these things are military values, and all of them are just as valuable in a corporate setting.

Outreach Positions or Training Material Development

Many personnel officers spend their time in the military developing training materials, creating new programs for a specific branch of the military, or reaching out to communities and charitable causes in new and innovative ways. These skills translate to a variety of positions on the civilian side of things, including everything from nonprofit jobs to digital marketing and electronic coding.

For those personnel officers who are looking to take on new challenges with old skills, these positions offer something a bit different from the norm. With the training and leadership skills that most veterans bring to the table, most employers will relish combining these positions with a veteran’s unique perspective.

Plenty of Really Great Job Opportunities Available

From human resources and management to things like marketing and community outreach, the number of relevant positions for the retired personnel officer is impressively large. All it takes is a creative approach to job hunting and an understanding of how to best apply these skills to managing people, deploying strategies, or guiding corporate departments to the achievement of shared goals.