What Jobs are Available For Former Military with Homeland Security?

Homeland SecurityMany veterans returning from war are choosing a smooth transition into civilian life by joining jobs available for former military with homeland security. In fact, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security states that 50,000 veteran service members are employed there, which makes up 25 percent of the agency’s total workforce. After the tragedy of 9/11 and growing threats in the Middle East, there’s a large demand in homeland security, according to Fire Link. Military veterans are often a perfect fit for homeland security, because their specialized training, leadership skills, and calm nature in the face of danger are invaluable. There’s numerous different homeland security jobs open in the United States and around the world to protect citizens from harm, but the following are among the most popular.

Intelligence Analyst

Intelligence analysts work in various government agencies like the CIA, NSA, and FBI to piece together important information to assess security threats. Whether in an office or out in the field, an intelligence analyst is tasked with creating assessments and conducting investigations on their assigned targets to prevent citizens from attacks. Former military are a good match for this job, because their tactical planning skills and knowledge of international conflicts help to accurately interpret data fast. Senior intelligence analysts can even work up to become a Facility Security Officer (FSO) or Federal Security Director (FSD).

Border Patrol Officer

On the front lines of law enforcement, border patrol officers play a prominent role in maintaining homeland security by maintaining the safety and security of America’s borders. Border patrol officers are responsible for preventing the illegal entry of aliens into our country along near 6,000 miles of Mexican and Canadian land borders as well as 2,000 miles of coastal waters. Veterans often succeed in border patrol because their vigilance helps with maintaining surveillance, conducting traffic checkpoints, and leading anti-smuggling investigations.

Immigration Enforcement Agent

Along similar lines, immigration enforcement agents work for the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) to promote homeland security by enforcing laws for customs, trade, and immigration. Immigration enforcement agents typically focus on performing investigations related to drug or weapon smuggling, human trafficking, and other immigration infractions to remove unlawful aliens. IEAs are responsible for identifying domestic and international activities that are moving people and goods into the United States illegally. Military members are well-prepared for entering high risk areas where these criminals, terrorists, and undocumented immigrants may be hiding.

Cyber Security Specialist

As one of the fastest-growing homeland security fields, cyber security is a specialized niche that can be right for former military with great computer skills. In an effort to prevent dangerous cyber attacks and breaches, cyber security specialists work hard to monitor computer networks closely to ensure sensitive data is well-protected. Whether they work in government, business, or a private sector, cyber security specialists are vital to keep our growing number of computer information systems safe from infiltration. They perform risk assessments and review violations to quickly resolve any security weaknesses.

Related Resource: Jobs for Former Military in the CIA

Although the skills obtained in the military are helpful, most upper-level homeland security jobs will also require candidates to have a bachelor’s degree, according to the Department of Homeland Security. A specific major isn’t required, but choosing to earn an undergraduate degree in homeland security, emergency management, law enforcement, criminal justice, public administration, or a related area is advised. With this educational background, a wide range of jobs available for former military with homeland security will unlock, including others like Secret Service agent, emergency management specialist, and transportation inspector.